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PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2012 3:53 am 
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Hey, I'm new here to the forums, and I was wondering if anybody can help me to get on the track to programming games with C++.

Just to give some background, I originally had some experience with GML, but I reall want to start using a professional language in order to work on a specific project of mine. I actually had started up on the basics of C++ (an 800 page book and some websites to be more specific), but I am having trouble understanding where exactly I should start. I really have no idea whether or not I am using the right program for a specific tutorial, or whether or not I am consulting the right tutorial, which was why I gave up on it about a year ago. Now I feel like getting back on the bandwagon and try again to get a hold on learning how to make games with C++. It should probably be best to assume that I have absolutely no knowledge of C++ (I cannot really remember much of the basics that I have read), but do have some experience programming (I am fluent in GML).

What I want is to know what type of programs and tutorials you recommend for me to get started. Hopefully, a step by step guide in learning how to actually create a visual game using the language (something more like a game that uses actual sprites, and not computer language games like tic-tac-toe), to the point where I can feel comfortable in what I am doing. I am trying to work towards making 2D games specifically, so any tutorials on making sprite-based games would probably be best here.


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PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2012 12:52 pm 
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If you want to dive into the graphics stuff, you need to pick a graphics library. I like using SFML and they have really nice tutorials to get sprites blitting to the screen pretty quickly. From there it's a matter of creating some game mechanics.

If you're really rusty on the C++, then you could go through the tutorials on cplusplus.org for a refresher. Or to get a really solid C++ education you can download, read and work your way through the exercises in Thinking in C++.

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PostPosted: Thu May 03, 2012 6:54 pm 
Just go get yourself a book called *beginning c++ through game programming* get the latest edition, why choose this book? Simply, it's the best book for a beginner. Unless your 800 pages book covers all the important topics in c++ such as (pointers, references , classes , functions and so on ..) Then once you're competent with the language go amazon.com and search for a decent 2d opengl, SDL or allegro whichever you want. Don't waste your time on online tutorials they're all crap, if there's something in the book that you don't understand watch a tutorial vid on youtube and that'll do. Goodluck.


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PostPosted: Sat May 05, 2012 8:44 am 
Dexterous Droid
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Quote:
Don't waste your time on online tutorials they're all crap

That's a bit extreme. I've learned a lot of useful things from online tutorials. The quality of the material is not dependant on the medium in which it exists. Books can be very helpful as well, depending on the book. It should never be an either-or situation, they're both potential sources of information.

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PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2012 4:08 pm 
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Thanks guys. I am currently downloaded a (slightly dated) book online, and I am reading through it right now. I will take a look at the other tutorials that you posted as well IGTHORN, and as for the book you suggested ekbanz, I was wondering whether or not there is a free version of the book that you have in mind. But I am not sure that I really need it though (yes, my 800 page book does cover those concepts if I remember, so I can probably read it again to refresh my memory.

Maybe it will help if you guys also provide your own experience of how you got into C++ game programming. It will help to give me an idea of whether or not I am taking the right path here.


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PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2012 9:59 pm 
Dexterous Droid
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I got started using the tutorials on cplusplus.org and a little book called C++ Pocket Reference written by Kyle Loudon from O'Reilly Publishers. I was also forced to learn C++ really quickly by university assignments, we had a 2 week introduction to C++ and then all assignments and practicals for that year were done in C++. Baptism by fire! Not a pleasant experience, but I did learn material quickly.

My understanding of C++ was really solidified by reading and working through Thinking in C++. The exercises in that book are excellent.

I still consult the Pocket Reference whenever I'm programming in C++ to remember things like operator precedence, or other details that tend to trip one up.

The real trick to learning a language is to use it. The quickest way to gain experience is to grind through some problems, these seem like a good place to start: http://www.cs.clemson.edu/~steve/Papers ... oblems.pdf

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PostPosted: Fri May 11, 2012 7:13 pm 
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Joined: Tue May 01, 2012 3:45 am
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I am still trying to get the hang of things here. I have tried to use the SFML library (both 1.6 in VC 2005 and 2010 and 2.0 in 2010), but apparently I always get as crash when I use App.Clear() :( . I am trying to follow my book, which best recommends Visual Studio 2005, but in that version, I am apparently missing some templates, templates which I apparently need in the first tutorial, which is not running properly either :( . I have tried looking at some solutions, but none are working so far. It seems as though no matter what I do, there is always going to be some unexpected issue that suddenly pops up sooner or later, and believe me its annoying, but at least I am still trying.

I don't know why I am saying this here, I just wanted to vent my current frustration...


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PostPosted: Fri May 11, 2012 7:51 pm 
Dexterous Droid
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Location: South Africa
Welcome to the world of programming :lol

Outdated books are incredibly annoying to try and follow. That's where online resources shine. Books in my opinion should contain timeless information as much as possible, and be useful as references.

Install Code::Blocks - it's a gentle introduction to the world of C++ if you get the version with the bundled compiler. But you've got plenty of cussing ahead of you learning how to set up library paths, include directories and other such fun stuff.

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PostPosted: Mon May 14, 2012 9:02 pm 
ekbanz wrote:
Just go get yourself a book called *beginning c++ through game programming* get the latest edition, why choose this book? Simply, it's the best book for a beginner. Unless your 800 pages book covers all the important topics in c++ such as (pointers, references , classes , functions and so on ..) Then once you're competent with the language go amazon.com and search for a decent 2d opengl, SDL or allegro whichever you want. Don't waste your time on online tutorials they're all crap, if there's something in the book that you don't understand watch a tutorial vid on youtube and that'll do. Goodluck.



Thanks for mentioning that book. My 9 year old is into programming and this book is ideal.


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PostPosted: Fri May 18, 2012 4:09 pm 
Bit Baby

Joined: Mon Aug 15, 2011 1:27 am
Posts: 8
Once you have the basics of C++ down, run through this tutorial. Once done, you should be ready to program your own game and know a bit more about C++.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 09, 2012 5:08 am 
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Joined: Thu Aug 09, 2012 4:50 am
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IMO your current primary goal should be to understand C++, and THEN apply it to game programming.

I suggest that you read the following books on C++:
* Stanley Lippman - C++ Primer
* Nicolai Josuttis - The C++ Standard Library
* Scott Meyers - Effective C++
* Scott Meyers - Effective STL
* N.Solter S. Kleper - Professional C++ (not a well-known book, but I like it)

Once you're comfortable with the language, you can start reading more advanced books:
* Bjarne Stroustrup - The C++ Programming Language (this is actually the most important book on C++, because it comes from the author of the language. But it can be tough for newcomers, so I put it in the "advanced" section).
* Bjarne Stroustrup - Design and Evolution of C++ (to understand why certain parts of the language work the way they do)
* Andrei Alexandriescu - Modern C++ Design (you probably don't need this one, but it's kinda fun to read).

Of course, the key to mastering the language is practice, practice, practice. Write you own code. If you want to get into game programming, write your own games! I suggest that you don't dive right into OpenGL or DirectX - that will be an overwhelming amount of new information. Instead, get the SDL library, read a couple of tutorials and pick a simple project for yourself. Write a clone of Sokoban or Tetris in C++ using SDL. This may sound boring compared to 3D action games, but actually you will learn a lot in the process. Once you're done with these, you can try doing more complex projects.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 09, 2012 5:29 pm 
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Joined: Sun Oct 16, 2011 3:09 pm
Posts: 366
Location: Here (where else?)
lmoh wrote:
Maybe it will help if you guys also provide your own experience of how you got into C++ game programming. It will help to give me an idea of whether or not I am taking the right path here.
Hmm, most people here seem to have started in game programming. I started at the other end, namely making serious programs (compilers, simulation engines), and wanting to have some code refactoring experience, I started hacking in Micropolis, and OpenTTD. Other favorite project is my FreeRCT project (nobody wrote a RCT clone, yet, so I decided to start one :) ). I write stuff in C++, Python, and Java (for work).

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 14, 2012 5:33 pm 
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Joined: Fri Dec 14, 2012 4:23 pm
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lmoh wrote:
Hey, I'm new here to the forums, and I was wondering if anybody can help me to get on the track to programming games with C++.

Just to give some background, I originally had some experience with GML, but I reall want to start using a professional language in order to work on a specific project of mine. I actually had started up on the basics of C++ (an 800 page book and some websites to be more specific), but I am having trouble understanding where exactly I should start. I really have no idea whether or not I am using the right program for a specific tutorial, or whether or not I am consulting the right tutorial, which was why I gave up on it about a year ago. Now I feel like getting back on the bandwagon and try again to get a hold on learning how to make games with C++. It should probably be best to assume that I have absolutely no knowledge of C++ (I cannot really remember much of the basics that I have read), but do have some experience programming (I am fluent in GML).

What I want is to know what type of programs and tutorials you recommend for me to get started. Hopefully, a step by step guide in learning how to actually create a visual game using the language (something more like a game that uses actual sprites, and not computer language games like tic-tac-toe), to the point where I can feel comfortable in what I am doing. I am trying to work towards making 2D games specifically, so any tutorials on making sprite-based games would probably be best here.


I highly recommend a book (about $60) at a Barnes and Noble called C++ Primer Plus (Sixth Edition) it has everything you could ever need to know about C++ from a beginners shoes (primer meaning you have no prior knowledge of anything) Also thinking in C++ is really extensive and is usually suggested after you read a developer's library. C++ Primer Plus is a developer's library, I don't recommend pirating anything, just go out and buy a newest edition of a book, you get a lot more out of it (C++11, boost library documentation and revisions) if you can't afford anything like that I do not recommend online tutorials a free ebook like thinking in C++ is a great start, I've got to warn you the Primer plus book is over 1300 pages so be ready to cringe when you see it on your book shelf staring at you menacingly without even a dent put into reading it after a couple days of reading non stop. It might take a sleepless night or two to just finish it I can't stay focused enough when I read the thing I always walk away and play a video game (don't do this please) my best advice learning from my mistakes is just to sit down and get it all done at once.

The reason I don't recommend any online tutorials is you said you want to professionally use C++, well I don't see any professional careers where you learn everything properly (the industry standard way) there is to know through youtube videos or online tutorials. I do have to mention people really exaggerate how hard it is to learn C++ its just time consuming. Its always smart to learn the language before you get involved in anything because there are all sorts of things that can go wrong. It takes 10 years to learn a language and fully understand it inside and out - says many professionals, if you listen to them though, do you really think your going to get anywhere? It took me a good 3 or four weeks to get through the first 300 pages, sitting down and making myself do it was/will be the hardest part, not learning anything you can even get quizzes at the end of each chapter you may want to look over. I don't recommend online tutorials again, because in a profession that just isn't going to cut it, unless of coarse its something like thinking in C++, that is free and online, you sometimes find gem's like those laying around but don't count on finding them to learn something without extensive research you could have used to learn something with in a developer's library.


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